Research Staff

Kallesh Jayappa Danappa

Research Scientist
Kester Lab, Pinn Hall, Rm. 1215

email: kd3p@virginia.edu
phone: 434-982-5892

My research focusses on development of novel therapies for B cell leukemia/lymphoma. Our recent work discovered multidrug-resistant cancer cells in leukemia/lymphoma patients de novo; these cells exhibit selection during treatment with pro-apoptotic anti-cancer therapies such as venetoclax (Jayappa et al., Blood Adv, 2021). We are exploring C6 ceramide nanoliposome-based therapies to deplete this reservoir of multidrug-resistant cancer cells in leukemia/lymphoma patients. In another project, we discovered the overexpression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in drug resistant persister cancer cells in mantle cell lymphoma patients. We are investigating the role of AID in cancer cell survival and/or drug resistance, and exploring ways to target this protein for treatment in relapsed/refractory  patients. These novel therapies hold significant promise in achieving broader, deeper and more durable responses in cancer patients.

 

Smriti Gupta

Research Associate
Zhu Lab, Pinn Hall, Rm. 5025

email: sg8sp@virginia.edu
phone: 434-243-9562

Primary research area of interest is elucidation of neural circuits in behaving animals and deep brain stimulation. Other research interest include understanding metabolic basis of different neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s Disease, Type 3 diabetes, Anxiety Disorders, Dementia, Depression and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).

Yi Hao

Research Scientist
Bochkis Lab, Pinn Hall, Rm 5026

email: yh8a@virginia.edu
phone: 434-982-6753

My research is to study the role of pioneer factor Foxa2 in modulating chromatin accessibility for ligand-dependent activation of nuclear receptors and to investigate the regulation of heterochromatin at nuclear lamina in metabolic diseases, utilizing both experimental and computational methods.

Keyong Li

Keyong Li, Ph.D.

Research Scientist
Bayliss Lab, Pinn 5013

email: kl4jd@virginia.edu
phone: 434-982-4466

My current study is how central chemoreceptors modulate respiration when exposed to high CO2 or the pH changed in blood in development. Phox2b (+) neurons in Retrotrapezoid Nucleus (RTN) are intrinsically sensitive to pH and play a vital role in regulating respiration. My study is focusing on the developmental changes of their pH-sensitivity and excitability. Multiple techniques including patch clamp, PCR, immunohistochemistry, imaging are used to investigate the ion channels in RTN neurons which are contributing to the developmental changes from cellular level to molecular level. Finally, the identified ion channels will be tested in whole animal model using in vivo gene transfer. The goal is to illuminate the mechanisms of modulation neuronal excitability and of respiration in development.

Mohan C Manjegowda

Research Associate
Scott Lab, Pinn Hall, Rm 5050C

email: mcm3ha@virginia.edu
phone: 434-243-1920

I hail from the foothills of the Western Ghats, India. Completed my bachelor’s degree in biotechnology from Visvesvaraya Technological University and Ph.D. from Dept. of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, India. My doctoral research was focused on understanding the expression regulation and significance of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER1) in breast cancer. My research interests are epigenetics, chromatin dynamics, and gene expression regulation.

The focus of my postdoctoral research is to understand the onset and development of fatty liver disease (hepatic steatosis). Excessive accumulation of fat in the hepatocytes is a characteristic feature of hepatic steatosis. The pathological condition is also associated with the wrinkled nuclear lamina and abnormal nuclear morphology. I am studying the significance of this wrinkled nuclear lamina on chromatin dynamics and gene expression regulation. Using a gene-therapy approach, I am exploring the possibilities of reverting the wrinkles of the nuclear lamina to develop a treatment strategy. Next-generation sequencing techniques such as ChIP-Seq, Hi-C, and RNA-Seq are some of the high-end techniques I use for my investigation.

George M.P.R. Souza, PhD

Research Scientist
Abbott/Guyenet Lab, Pinn Hall 5228

email: gs4bd@virginia.edu
phone: 434-227-6010

My research interest is related to neural control of breathing and blood pressure. We are investigating how neurons at the lower brainstem (retrotrapezoid nucleus and rostral ventrolateral medulla) regulate breathing, blood gases homeostasis, blood pressure and arousal. We use chemo- and optogenetic approaches in vivo to perform gain- or loss-of-function experiments in order to reveal the role of specific neuronal types in those physiological variables.