Atomic Force Microscope (AFM)

The Department houses a Multimode 8 Veeco (now Bruker) high resolution Atomic Force Microscope configured primarily for imaging and measurement of the physical properties of proteins, nucleic acids, supported membranes, and organelles in physiological buffers in real time.

The Department houses a Multimode 8 Veeco (now Bruker) high resolution Atomic Force Microscope configured primarily for imaging and measurement of the physical properties of proteins, nucleic acids, supported membranes, and organelles in physiological buffers in real time.

The Atomic Force Microscope senses the physical properties of a sample by passing a sharp probe on a cantilever over the sample and detecting deflections in the cantilever using reflections from a laser beam.

The Atomic Force Microscope senses the physical properties of a sample by passing a sharp probe on a cantilever over the sample and detecting deflections in the cantilever using reflections from a laser beam.

AFM image of the calcium-dependent, membrane-binding protein copine I bound to a mica-supported phospholipid (PS/PC) bilayer. Copine molecules are seen to form extended linear assemblies on the bilayer. Phase image taken in tapping mode, scale in microns (from Creutz and Edwardson, BBA Biomembranes 1788: 1950-1961 (2009)).

AFM image of the calcium-dependent, membrane-binding protein copine I bound to a mica-supported phospholipid (PS/PC) bilayer. Copine molecules are seen to form extended linear assemblies on the bilayer. Phase image taken in tapping mode, scale in microns (from Creutz and Edwardson, BBA Biomembranes 1788: 1950-1961 (2009)).